Learn lots of really useful prepositions of movement.

This will help you understand lots of other expressions and phrasal verbs in English!

 “Towards” means in the general direction of something.

For example: “The cat ran towards the box.”

We use “to” for movement in the direction of something.

For example: “The cat is going to the box.”

“Away from” is for movement in the opposite direction.

For example: “The cat is going away from the box.”

We can use “from” and “to” to describe movement from one point to another.

For example: “The cat went from the box to the chair.”

“Out of” is for movement from inside to outside.

For example: “The cat jumped out of the box.”

“Up to” refers to movement as far as a specific point, or “until” that point.

For example: “The cat walked up to the box and sat down.”

And “into” is for movement from outside to inside.

For example: “The cat jumped into the box.”

And “onto” for movement to a surface and on top of it.

For example: “The cat jumped onto the box.”

We can use “off” for movement away from a surface.

For example: “The cat jumped off the box.”

“Along” is used to describe continuous movement at the side of something, or for movement along a “line” such as a road, river, path or trail.

For example: “The cat walked along the side of the box.”

We can use “down/up” to describe movement along the whole length of something.

For example: “The cat walked down the road, then jumped onto the box.”

“Past” is used to indicate movement that passes a point or object.

For example: “The cat ran past the box.”

We use “up” for movement to a higher point/area.

For example: “The cat climbed up the box.”

And we use “down” for movement to a lower point/area.

For example: “The cat climbed down the box.”

We use “through” for movement inside a closed space from one end of it to the other.

For example: “The cat went through the box.”

And we use “across” for movement that involves going from one side of something to another side of it. For example, going across a river, field, park or city square (often by walking / riding / driving on the surface of it).

For example: “The cat walked across the box.”

We use “over” for movement that involves crossing from one side of something to another side of it, often by going above that thing (in the air, for example).

For example: “The cat flew over the box.”

And finally, we use “round/around” for any type of circular movement around an object / thing / person, etc.

For example: “The cat walked around the box.”

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