What do you think gutted, grub and gobsmacked mean in English? They’re all English slang terms.

This is the type of language that native speakers use when they’re chatting to friends in the pub, at home or in the street. You can also hear slang English in films, TV series and songs.

So, it’s important to learn because native English speakers use it a lot. But how can you find out about the meaning of slang English?

Unfortunately, there isn’t much about slang in traditional course books. And very often, the words might not even appear in dictionaries. So, just to help you, here are some popular slang terms.

By the way, we don’t suggest you use the words, but it’s important to understand the meaning of them so you can follow native English speakers more easily

  1. TO FLOG

If you “flog” something, you sell it.

A: Where’s your car?

B: I flogged it to Mike.

  1. MATE

Your “mates” are your friends.

A: What are you doing this evening?

B: I’m going to the pub with a few mates. Do you want to come?

  1. GRUB

“Grub” is food. If you say “Grub’s up!”, it means, “The food is ready!”

A: Grub’s up!

B: OK. I’ll be down in a minute.

  1. GUTTED

If you’re “gutted”, you’re upset or disappointed.

A: I was gutted to hear about your uncle.

B: Thanks. It all happened so suddenly

  1. PEANUTS

If you pay someone “peanuts”, you pay them very little money.

A: I like my job, but I get paid peanuts.

B: You should think about changing.

  1. GOBSMACKED

If you’re “gobsmacked”, you can’t believe what you’re hearing.

A: Did you hear about Pete getting arrested?

B: Yeah, I was completely gobsmacked!

  1. TO LEG IT

If you “leg it”, you escape from a place by running away.

A: What did you do when the police arrived?

B: We legged it.

  1. SORTED

If a problem is “sorted”, it is fixed.

A: Did you send out all the invitations?

B: Yeah, it’s sorted!

  1. TO BE IN A STROP

If someone is “in a strop”, they’re angry about something.

A: What’s wrong with Pete?

B: He’s in a strop because no one remembered his birthday

  1. WICKED

Something “wicked” is cool or good. It can also be used to mean “Great!”

A: We’re through to the next round in the competition!

B: Wicked!

  1. ZONKED OUT

If someone is “zonked out”, they’re sleeping, or very tired or exhausted.

A: Where’s Zoe?

B: She’s completely zonked out – she didn’t get home till about 6 in the morning.

  1. DONKEY’S YEARS

If you haven’t seen someone in “donkey’s years”, you haven’t seen them for a long time.

A: Mike’s going to be at the party too.

B: Oh, great. I haven’t seen him in donkey’s years.

  1. TO THROW A SPANNER IN THE WORKS

If A “throws a spanner in the works” of B, A ruins or destroys B.

A: How did conference go?

B: Not too well. Right at the last minute the speaker cancelled, which really threw a spanner in the works.

  1. TO WIND UP

If you “wind someone up”, you joke with them or play a trick on them in order to annoy them. “Are you winding me up?” means, “Are you joking?” or, “Are you playing a trick on me?”

A: Guess what? Sarah’s outside.

B: Are you winding me up?

  1. TO WANGLE SOMETHING

If you “wangle” something good, you manage to get it, often by tricking people, or by being lucky or charming.

A: How did Jack wangle an invite to the party?

B: Oh, you know him. He used his charm and good looks.

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