Leo the Lion prowls the night,

A proud constellation, a cat burning bright.

He sharpens his claws on Venus and Mars

Filling the sky with new shooting stars.

You don’t like to go on adventures, do you? Oh, you do?

Perhaps it was you. The child with your name put on your puffy coat, grabbed the ancient map from your bookshelf, and headed outside.

Wait. You don’t have an ancient map on your bookshelf? Maybe you should look more closely next time (on the bottom shelf in the far back).

A red line appeared on the map. The line began at your house, twisted through the enchanted woods, and ended at a star. Below the star were the words DANGER, HELP, and WATCH OUT!!!

The child with your name followed the map. The enchanted woods were dark and covered in sticky shadows. The child bravely entered the woods anyway.

Was this a good idea? I’m not sure. Not all adventures are good ideas.

There was no path between the trees. The child with your name tripped over rocks and roots. Something in the woods slithered.

ONCE THERE WAS a child with your name. Though it wasn’t you. Thechild had hair about your length and your color eyes. But this is probably a coincidence! Because this child was about to go on an adventure.

Something hooted. Something scratched.

Finally, the child stumbled into a clearing where there was a cottage, a cauldron, and a star. Well, only part of a star because stars, as you probably know, are very large. This particular star part looked miserable. It was chained to a tree.

When the star saw the child, it began to shine.

“Who lives here?” whispered the child with your name.

“A star-eater,” the star whispered back. “Hurry. Can you throw me high enough so I can get back home?”

Stars are heavy. Even part of a star is difficult to lift. But the child with your name was so strong. The child unchained the star, took three deep breaths, and threw the star upward (as hard as you can throw). Golden stardust swirled in the air and coated the child’s coat sleeves.

“Thank you!” the star cried out before it found its place in the sky. Oh, you didn’t know a child with your name could rescue a star? Well, now you know.

A roar erupted from the cottage. Tentacles, scales, and a spiky tail swarmed out the cottage door. “Where is my star?” yelled a crackling voice.

The child with your name turned and ran.

A star-eater is fast, but you are faster. The child with your name hurried through the forest and back home, and spent the rest of the afternoon scraping off stardust.

The child kept the golden dust in a jar in your closet. The jar shone all day and all night.

You aren’t sure you have a jar of stardust in your closet? Check the top shelf on the right. Hold on to such light.

It might come in useful for future adventures to dark places, should this child with your name —or you—go adventuring again soon.

Tin Liên Quan